Worth your weight in salt

Community Mar 21, 2017 by Andrew Coppolino Kitchener Post

We are right in the middle of what has been called “World Salt Awareness Week,” a week of awareness initiated by an organization called World Action on Salt and Health. Certainly, salt is a universal human ingredient and one we do well by in watching our intake.

Salt has always been a vitally important part of the way we cook. For hundreds of years, sodium chloride has been a flavour enhancer and seasoning ingredient and, even more crucial to human evolution, salt has been a preserving agent that has kept food safe for eating over time by prohibiting nasty germs from settling in.

From rock salt to free-running salt to kosher and sea salt, salt is salt. That is, one kind is not healthier than another, they contain only marginal differences in the amount of sodium chloride. The amount of salt we use in food preparation makes up for about six per cent of production; three times that is used for de-icing roads in winter in North America.

While it is a good idea to watch and moderate your salt intake especially through processed foods, restaurants along with their use of butter, use salt to make food taste really, really good. By all means monitor your salt consumption, but let’s look at the positive side of salt in the kitchen.

Try using salt as a cooking medium: bury a whole fish in salt mixed with eggs to bind and bake it in the oven to produce a tender and moist entree. New potatoes packed together with coarse salt and roasted for an hour make for an interesting plate presentation.

Salt has other kitchen applications as well.

Make sure you have a good handful or two of salt ready to toss onto a grease fire (never water); the same goes for cleaning up a dropped egg: sprinkle liberally with salt and let it work a few moments to firm up the liquid.

Salt makes a brilliant cleaner too. If you’ve got a pot that is badly burned and stained, apply some salt, add some water and let it sit 10 minutes or so. Give it a scrub and the pot should come away much cleaner.

Execute any of these techniques and you will be “worth your salt,” a phrase derived from ancient Rome connoting competence and efficiency that you’ve earned your pay cheque and could then use the money to purchase salt.

Worth your weight in salt

Community Mar 21, 2017 by Andrew Coppolino Kitchener Post

We are right in the middle of what has been called “World Salt Awareness Week,” a week of awareness initiated by an organization called World Action on Salt and Health. Certainly, salt is a universal human ingredient and one we do well by in watching our intake.

Salt has always been a vitally important part of the way we cook. For hundreds of years, sodium chloride has been a flavour enhancer and seasoning ingredient and, even more crucial to human evolution, salt has been a preserving agent that has kept food safe for eating over time by prohibiting nasty germs from settling in.

From rock salt to free-running salt to kosher and sea salt, salt is salt. That is, one kind is not healthier than another, they contain only marginal differences in the amount of sodium chloride. The amount of salt we use in food preparation makes up for about six per cent of production; three times that is used for de-icing roads in winter in North America.

While it is a good idea to watch and moderate your salt intake especially through processed foods, restaurants along with their use of butter, use salt to make food taste really, really good. By all means monitor your salt consumption, but let’s look at the positive side of salt in the kitchen.

Try using salt as a cooking medium: bury a whole fish in salt mixed with eggs to bind and bake it in the oven to produce a tender and moist entree. New potatoes packed together with coarse salt and roasted for an hour make for an interesting plate presentation.

Salt has other kitchen applications as well.

Make sure you have a good handful or two of salt ready to toss onto a grease fire (never water); the same goes for cleaning up a dropped egg: sprinkle liberally with salt and let it work a few moments to firm up the liquid.

Salt makes a brilliant cleaner too. If you’ve got a pot that is badly burned and stained, apply some salt, add some water and let it sit 10 minutes or so. Give it a scrub and the pot should come away much cleaner.

Execute any of these techniques and you will be “worth your salt,” a phrase derived from ancient Rome connoting competence and efficiency that you’ve earned your pay cheque and could then use the money to purchase salt.

Worth your weight in salt

Community Mar 21, 2017 by Andrew Coppolino Kitchener Post

We are right in the middle of what has been called “World Salt Awareness Week,” a week of awareness initiated by an organization called World Action on Salt and Health. Certainly, salt is a universal human ingredient and one we do well by in watching our intake.

Salt has always been a vitally important part of the way we cook. For hundreds of years, sodium chloride has been a flavour enhancer and seasoning ingredient and, even more crucial to human evolution, salt has been a preserving agent that has kept food safe for eating over time by prohibiting nasty germs from settling in.

From rock salt to free-running salt to kosher and sea salt, salt is salt. That is, one kind is not healthier than another, they contain only marginal differences in the amount of sodium chloride. The amount of salt we use in food preparation makes up for about six per cent of production; three times that is used for de-icing roads in winter in North America.

While it is a good idea to watch and moderate your salt intake especially through processed foods, restaurants along with their use of butter, use salt to make food taste really, really good. By all means monitor your salt consumption, but let’s look at the positive side of salt in the kitchen.

Try using salt as a cooking medium: bury a whole fish in salt mixed with eggs to bind and bake it in the oven to produce a tender and moist entree. New potatoes packed together with coarse salt and roasted for an hour make for an interesting plate presentation.

Salt has other kitchen applications as well.

Make sure you have a good handful or two of salt ready to toss onto a grease fire (never water); the same goes for cleaning up a dropped egg: sprinkle liberally with salt and let it work a few moments to firm up the liquid.

Salt makes a brilliant cleaner too. If you’ve got a pot that is badly burned and stained, apply some salt, add some water and let it sit 10 minutes or so. Give it a scrub and the pot should come away much cleaner.

Execute any of these techniques and you will be “worth your salt,” a phrase derived from ancient Rome connoting competence and efficiency that you’ve earned your pay cheque and could then use the money to purchase salt.