Med school mash-ups inspired Kitchener startup

News Apr 12, 2017 by Terry Pender Waterloo Region Record

KITCHENER — In the white-hot intensity of medical school, Michael Pazaratz made friends for life.

The challenge of maintaining the friendships as the budding doctors scattered around the country for residency training ultimately led Pazaratz out of medicine, and into Waterloo Region's startup scene as the founder of Rave Media Inc.

Pazaratz was in the first class of students at the downtown Kitchener campus of McMaster University's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. He started his studies there at about the same time the startup scene was beginning in the city core. The med students and startup techies mashed it up socially.

While completing his residency in nuclear medicine at London Health Sciences Centre, Pazaratz and his former classmates kept in touch by texting, and sending YouTube links of movies, trailers and music.

"Most people in our medical school class went far, far away and the relationships were carried on mostly through text," said Pazaratz. "A lot of those texts were YouTube links to songs that we knew, to movie trailers, to sequels of movies, to things that interested us."

Pazaratz and his friends quickly grew frustrated because they could not watch content together at the same time. Some posts spoiled it for others who had not yet viewed the material. So he started looking for an app or platform that could be downloaded and help the group of friends maintain meaningful connections.

He couldn't find anything so he founded Rave Media as he was finishing his residency in London. He moved back to Kitchener to build his startup.

That was three years ago, and the first product was launched not long after. It allows an unlimited number of people to watch the same video at the same time, or listen to the same music at the same time, and share their thoughts about it with other members of the group.

The app synchronizes smartphones to create a single, giant speaker system, no matter where the group members are located. They can watch videos with friends in Europe while chatting with text and voice-over-Internet-protocol. Groups of any size can be created to simultaneously watch YouTube, Vimeo, Reddit, Google Drive or Dropbox videos together.

Next, Rave released a virtual reality app for its social media platform.

The Rave team was in Austin, Texas recently for the public launch of its latest baby — Rave DJ. You use the app to enter two songs and the artificial intelligence platform creates a mashup.

"I grew up with DJs like Girl Talk, and other mashup artists, and I honestly learned about music from them," said Pazaratz.

Talented DJs can take two different songs and make something that is, arguably, better than the originals. When Pazaratz looked for technology that could do that for consumers, he couldn't find anything.

"When we saw that nobody was doing this we said: 'Let's be the vanguard, and let's make the fist AI-generated music,'" he said.

The app takes the keys, melodies, bass lines and arrangements of two songs, and creates something new within minutes. The technology boils down the songs to their DNA and grows a new one, said Pazaratz.

"We think this technology is really interesting when you start applying it to play lists," he said. "You take a Spotify playlist of 25 songs, and there is the Rave DJ button and we rearrange all our songs in order of mashability."

The result is a 90-minute set of your favourite music played in surprising ways.

 

"It's like you had a DJ spend a couple of weeks making a whole set for you, but we just did it in a couple of minutes," said Pazaratz.

Rave has a staff of 37 working in offices on the second floor of a former industrial building at 130 Weber St. W. The startup went through Google for Entrepreneurs and continues to work with the tech giant.

"I left medicine to start this," said Pazaratz. "I actually started this before I left medicine, and then I had to choose between medicine, my lifelong pursuit, and my growing and very time-hungry baby. I said: 'If I don't do this, I am going to spend the rest of my life regretting it.'"

tpender@therecord.com , Twitter: @PenderRecord

Med school mash-ups inspired Kitchener startup

News Apr 12, 2017 by Terry Pender Waterloo Region Record

KITCHENER — In the white-hot intensity of medical school, Michael Pazaratz made friends for life.

The challenge of maintaining the friendships as the budding doctors scattered around the country for residency training ultimately led Pazaratz out of medicine, and into Waterloo Region's startup scene as the founder of Rave Media Inc.

Pazaratz was in the first class of students at the downtown Kitchener campus of McMaster University's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. He started his studies there at about the same time the startup scene was beginning in the city core. The med students and startup techies mashed it up socially.

While completing his residency in nuclear medicine at London Health Sciences Centre, Pazaratz and his former classmates kept in touch by texting, and sending YouTube links of movies, trailers and music.

"Most people in our medical school class went far, far away and the relationships were carried on mostly through text," said Pazaratz. "A lot of those texts were YouTube links to songs that we knew, to movie trailers, to sequels of movies, to things that interested us."

Pazaratz and his friends quickly grew frustrated because they could not watch content together at the same time. Some posts spoiled it for others who had not yet viewed the material. So he started looking for an app or platform that could be downloaded and help the group of friends maintain meaningful connections.

He couldn't find anything so he founded Rave Media as he was finishing his residency in London. He moved back to Kitchener to build his startup.

That was three years ago, and the first product was launched not long after. It allows an unlimited number of people to watch the same video at the same time, or listen to the same music at the same time, and share their thoughts about it with other members of the group.

The app synchronizes smartphones to create a single, giant speaker system, no matter where the group members are located. They can watch videos with friends in Europe while chatting with text and voice-over-Internet-protocol. Groups of any size can be created to simultaneously watch YouTube, Vimeo, Reddit, Google Drive or Dropbox videos together.

Next, Rave released a virtual reality app for its social media platform.

The Rave team was in Austin, Texas recently for the public launch of its latest baby — Rave DJ. You use the app to enter two songs and the artificial intelligence platform creates a mashup.

"I grew up with DJs like Girl Talk, and other mashup artists, and I honestly learned about music from them," said Pazaratz.

Talented DJs can take two different songs and make something that is, arguably, better than the originals. When Pazaratz looked for technology that could do that for consumers, he couldn't find anything.

"When we saw that nobody was doing this we said: 'Let's be the vanguard, and let's make the fist AI-generated music,'" he said.

The app takes the keys, melodies, bass lines and arrangements of two songs, and creates something new within minutes. The technology boils down the songs to their DNA and grows a new one, said Pazaratz.

"We think this technology is really interesting when you start applying it to play lists," he said. "You take a Spotify playlist of 25 songs, and there is the Rave DJ button and we rearrange all our songs in order of mashability."

The result is a 90-minute set of your favourite music played in surprising ways.

 

"It's like you had a DJ spend a couple of weeks making a whole set for you, but we just did it in a couple of minutes," said Pazaratz.

Rave has a staff of 37 working in offices on the second floor of a former industrial building at 130 Weber St. W. The startup went through Google for Entrepreneurs and continues to work with the tech giant.

"I left medicine to start this," said Pazaratz. "I actually started this before I left medicine, and then I had to choose between medicine, my lifelong pursuit, and my growing and very time-hungry baby. I said: 'If I don't do this, I am going to spend the rest of my life regretting it.'"

tpender@therecord.com , Twitter: @PenderRecord

Med school mash-ups inspired Kitchener startup

News Apr 12, 2017 by Terry Pender Waterloo Region Record

KITCHENER — In the white-hot intensity of medical school, Michael Pazaratz made friends for life.

The challenge of maintaining the friendships as the budding doctors scattered around the country for residency training ultimately led Pazaratz out of medicine, and into Waterloo Region's startup scene as the founder of Rave Media Inc.

Pazaratz was in the first class of students at the downtown Kitchener campus of McMaster University's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. He started his studies there at about the same time the startup scene was beginning in the city core. The med students and startup techies mashed it up socially.

While completing his residency in nuclear medicine at London Health Sciences Centre, Pazaratz and his former classmates kept in touch by texting, and sending YouTube links of movies, trailers and music.

"Most people in our medical school class went far, far away and the relationships were carried on mostly through text," said Pazaratz. "A lot of those texts were YouTube links to songs that we knew, to movie trailers, to sequels of movies, to things that interested us."

Pazaratz and his friends quickly grew frustrated because they could not watch content together at the same time. Some posts spoiled it for others who had not yet viewed the material. So he started looking for an app or platform that could be downloaded and help the group of friends maintain meaningful connections.

He couldn't find anything so he founded Rave Media as he was finishing his residency in London. He moved back to Kitchener to build his startup.

That was three years ago, and the first product was launched not long after. It allows an unlimited number of people to watch the same video at the same time, or listen to the same music at the same time, and share their thoughts about it with other members of the group.

The app synchronizes smartphones to create a single, giant speaker system, no matter where the group members are located. They can watch videos with friends in Europe while chatting with text and voice-over-Internet-protocol. Groups of any size can be created to simultaneously watch YouTube, Vimeo, Reddit, Google Drive or Dropbox videos together.

Next, Rave released a virtual reality app for its social media platform.

The Rave team was in Austin, Texas recently for the public launch of its latest baby — Rave DJ. You use the app to enter two songs and the artificial intelligence platform creates a mashup.

"I grew up with DJs like Girl Talk, and other mashup artists, and I honestly learned about music from them," said Pazaratz.

Talented DJs can take two different songs and make something that is, arguably, better than the originals. When Pazaratz looked for technology that could do that for consumers, he couldn't find anything.

"When we saw that nobody was doing this we said: 'Let's be the vanguard, and let's make the fist AI-generated music,'" he said.

The app takes the keys, melodies, bass lines and arrangements of two songs, and creates something new within minutes. The technology boils down the songs to their DNA and grows a new one, said Pazaratz.

"We think this technology is really interesting when you start applying it to play lists," he said. "You take a Spotify playlist of 25 songs, and there is the Rave DJ button and we rearrange all our songs in order of mashability."

The result is a 90-minute set of your favourite music played in surprising ways.

 

"It's like you had a DJ spend a couple of weeks making a whole set for you, but we just did it in a couple of minutes," said Pazaratz.

Rave has a staff of 37 working in offices on the second floor of a former industrial building at 130 Weber St. W. The startup went through Google for Entrepreneurs and continues to work with the tech giant.

"I left medicine to start this," said Pazaratz. "I actually started this before I left medicine, and then I had to choose between medicine, my lifelong pursuit, and my growing and very time-hungry baby. I said: 'If I don't do this, I am going to spend the rest of my life regretting it.'"

tpender@therecord.com , Twitter: @PenderRecord