Prime Minister Trudeau touts Canada first

News Apr 25, 2017 by Samantha Beattie Kitchener Post

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s visit to Vidyard was a long time coming.

The Waterloo Region tech company’s CEO Michael Litt went to a gathering at MP Raj Saini’s office after the Liberals won the 2015 federal election. There, he expressed his hope that one day Trudeau would visit.

A year and a half later, Litt was contacted by the Prime Minister’s Office late last week — Trudeau was planning on stopping by Vidyard’s Ktichener office on Tuesday.

“How did this happen? It’s a mindblowing experience,” said Litt, after giving Trudeau a tour of Vidyard's open-concept, modern space and hosting a question and answer period in front of his 200 employees and national media.

“I’m a big fan of his approach and what he wants for this country.”

Vidyard helps businesses use video in sales, marketing and internal communications. With the vast majority of Vidyards clients being located in the U.S., it has a vested interest in keeping people, goods and services flowing across Canada’s border.

“What we’re really concerned about is the protectionist type of mentality seen in public movements and more recently in renegotiating NAFTA, specifically adding tariffs,” said Litt to Trudeau during the Q and A. “How should we be thinking about these changes, specifically for software as a service?”

Trudeau said it’s in the U.S.’s interests as much as Canada’s to maintain interconnected economies.

“You cannot thicken this border without hurting people on both sides of it,” he said. “Any two countries are going to have issues and irritants, but frankly having a good constructive conversation allows us to work through those irritants.”

For Trudeau, Canada comes first.

“Standing up for Canada’s interests is what my job is, whether it’s soft wood, or software,”  Trudeau said to laughter. He was referring to the U.S.’s recent move to add a 20 per cent tariff to Canadian softwood lumber.

He also spoke about the importance of attracting global talent to the tech sector, and drawing back Canadians who work abroad.

“I don’t want to force people to stay in Canada, I want people to choose Canada.

"You left Canada, right?” Trudeau asked Litt, who worked in Silicon Valley before returning to Waterloo Region. “You came back with skills. There were opportunities for you. Having success in Canada mattered to you. It’s tied to Canadians having a sense of place, and knowing there are opportunities here.”

Trudeau said his government is creating opportunities by introducing coding to elementary school students, encouraging skilled immigration and promoting Canada’s tech industry abroad.

“Your success makes my job a lot easier when I go out to talk about how great Canada is, how great it is to invest in Canada,” he said. “I have the amazing example of Vidyard, its forward thinking, inclusiveness, diversity, creativity, innovation and success — exactly what I point to when I say Canada is doing exciting and great things.”

Prime Minister Trudeau touts Canada first

Trudeau praises Waterloo Region tech company for exemplifying 'how great Canada is'

News Apr 25, 2017 by Samantha Beattie Kitchener Post

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s visit to Vidyard was a long time coming.

The Waterloo Region tech company’s CEO Michael Litt went to a gathering at MP Raj Saini’s office after the Liberals won the 2015 federal election. There, he expressed his hope that one day Trudeau would visit.

A year and a half later, Litt was contacted by the Prime Minister’s Office late last week — Trudeau was planning on stopping by Vidyard’s Ktichener office on Tuesday.

“How did this happen? It’s a mindblowing experience,” said Litt, after giving Trudeau a tour of Vidyard's open-concept, modern space and hosting a question and answer period in front of his 200 employees and national media.

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“I’m a big fan of his approach and what he wants for this country.”

Vidyard helps businesses use video in sales, marketing and internal communications. With the vast majority of Vidyards clients being located in the U.S., it has a vested interest in keeping people, goods and services flowing across Canada’s border.

“What we’re really concerned about is the protectionist type of mentality seen in public movements and more recently in renegotiating NAFTA, specifically adding tariffs,” said Litt to Trudeau during the Q and A. “How should we be thinking about these changes, specifically for software as a service?”

Trudeau said it’s in the U.S.’s interests as much as Canada’s to maintain interconnected economies.

“You cannot thicken this border without hurting people on both sides of it,” he said. “Any two countries are going to have issues and irritants, but frankly having a good constructive conversation allows us to work through those irritants.”

For Trudeau, Canada comes first.

“Standing up for Canada’s interests is what my job is, whether it’s soft wood, or software,”  Trudeau said to laughter. He was referring to the U.S.’s recent move to add a 20 per cent tariff to Canadian softwood lumber.

He also spoke about the importance of attracting global talent to the tech sector, and drawing back Canadians who work abroad.

“I don’t want to force people to stay in Canada, I want people to choose Canada.

"You left Canada, right?” Trudeau asked Litt, who worked in Silicon Valley before returning to Waterloo Region. “You came back with skills. There were opportunities for you. Having success in Canada mattered to you. It’s tied to Canadians having a sense of place, and knowing there are opportunities here.”

Trudeau said his government is creating opportunities by introducing coding to elementary school students, encouraging skilled immigration and promoting Canada’s tech industry abroad.

“Your success makes my job a lot easier when I go out to talk about how great Canada is, how great it is to invest in Canada,” he said. “I have the amazing example of Vidyard, its forward thinking, inclusiveness, diversity, creativity, innovation and success — exactly what I point to when I say Canada is doing exciting and great things.”

Prime Minister Trudeau touts Canada first

Trudeau praises Waterloo Region tech company for exemplifying 'how great Canada is'

News Apr 25, 2017 by Samantha Beattie Kitchener Post

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s visit to Vidyard was a long time coming.

The Waterloo Region tech company’s CEO Michael Litt went to a gathering at MP Raj Saini’s office after the Liberals won the 2015 federal election. There, he expressed his hope that one day Trudeau would visit.

A year and a half later, Litt was contacted by the Prime Minister’s Office late last week — Trudeau was planning on stopping by Vidyard’s Ktichener office on Tuesday.

“How did this happen? It’s a mindblowing experience,” said Litt, after giving Trudeau a tour of Vidyard's open-concept, modern space and hosting a question and answer period in front of his 200 employees and national media.

Related Content

“I’m a big fan of his approach and what he wants for this country.”

Vidyard helps businesses use video in sales, marketing and internal communications. With the vast majority of Vidyards clients being located in the U.S., it has a vested interest in keeping people, goods and services flowing across Canada’s border.

“What we’re really concerned about is the protectionist type of mentality seen in public movements and more recently in renegotiating NAFTA, specifically adding tariffs,” said Litt to Trudeau during the Q and A. “How should we be thinking about these changes, specifically for software as a service?”

Trudeau said it’s in the U.S.’s interests as much as Canada’s to maintain interconnected economies.

“You cannot thicken this border without hurting people on both sides of it,” he said. “Any two countries are going to have issues and irritants, but frankly having a good constructive conversation allows us to work through those irritants.”

For Trudeau, Canada comes first.

“Standing up for Canada’s interests is what my job is, whether it’s soft wood, or software,”  Trudeau said to laughter. He was referring to the U.S.’s recent move to add a 20 per cent tariff to Canadian softwood lumber.

He also spoke about the importance of attracting global talent to the tech sector, and drawing back Canadians who work abroad.

“I don’t want to force people to stay in Canada, I want people to choose Canada.

"You left Canada, right?” Trudeau asked Litt, who worked in Silicon Valley before returning to Waterloo Region. “You came back with skills. There were opportunities for you. Having success in Canada mattered to you. It’s tied to Canadians having a sense of place, and knowing there are opportunities here.”

Trudeau said his government is creating opportunities by introducing coding to elementary school students, encouraging skilled immigration and promoting Canada’s tech industry abroad.

“Your success makes my job a lot easier when I go out to talk about how great Canada is, how great it is to invest in Canada,” he said. “I have the amazing example of Vidyard, its forward thinking, inclusiveness, diversity, creativity, innovation and success — exactly what I point to when I say Canada is doing exciting and great things.”