Former transportation minister to head up advisory board for High-Speed Rail

News Feb 13, 2018 by Namish Modi Kitchener Post

Another step has been taken in the construction of a High-Speed Rail corridor between Toronto and Windsor.

On Tuesday, Ontario Minister Transportation Minister Kathryn McGarry along with MPP for Kitchener Centre, Daiene Vernile, announced that David Collenette will head up the advisory board for the High-Speed Rail Project (HSR), which plans to connect Toronto to Windsor in much shorter travel times.

“I am pleased to announce Mr. Collenette’s appointment as chair of Ontario’s HSR Planning Advisory Board,“ said McGarry. “And I look forward to working with him as we move forward to build Canada’s first High-Speed Rail line.

“This is a landmark project, it has never been done before in Canada, so we wanted to choose somebody that had a lot of experience and background [in the area]. High-Speed Rail has the potential to expand the innovation super corridor within the Toronto to Windsor corridor, allowing businesses to attract the best talent.” 

Collenette was Canada’s Minister of Transportation from 1997 to 2003 and a member of Canada’s Liberal Party from 1974 to 2004 holding several other positions in the House of Commons. He also released a report in 2017 regarding the feasibility of the project and has been an adviser for Ontario since 2015.

McGarry describes Collenette as a “passionate and vocal advocate for the landmark project.”

The High-Speed Rail corridor would potentially make stops in London, Chatham-Kent, Guelph, Pearson Airport and Kitchener. Collenette says the goal is to have the Toronto to London corridor (with a stop in Kitchener) path built by 2025 while the Windsor extension would not be done till 2030 or 2031.

Commuters would get from Kitchener to Union Station in Toronto in 48 minutes and from London to Toronto in 73.

However, there will be an 18-24 month environmental assessment taking place first which allow for different voices to be heard such as Indigenous groups.

“This is something that’s really going ahead, I don’t think any other project has gotten to this stage,"  said Collonette, “You have an environmental assessment, you have officials engaged at MTO, infrastructure Ontario looking at the financing. I’m convinced this is going to be done, and within the time frame.”

The 71-year-old says the volume of population and industry growth is putting demands on the transportation network in the busiest part of Ontario. He added that the benefit to cost ratio makes it a good business proposition as well.

New tracks as well as existing ones would be the path for the trains to travel at up to 250 kilometres per hour.

The announcement, however, did not please Conservative MPP Michael Harris.

Harris, the MPP for Kitchener-Conestoga, says the announcement is “electioneering” engineered by Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals in advance of this summer’s Ontario election.

“This like déjà vu all over again, it’s the second election in a row that the Wynne Liberals have attempted to lure voters with high speed dreams,"  said Harris in a press release.

Former transportation minister to head up advisory board for High-Speed Rail

Goal is to finish portion of the project by 2025

News Feb 13, 2018 by Namish Modi Kitchener Post

Another step has been taken in the construction of a High-Speed Rail corridor between Toronto and Windsor.

On Tuesday, Ontario Minister Transportation Minister Kathryn McGarry along with MPP for Kitchener Centre, Daiene Vernile, announced that David Collenette will head up the advisory board for the High-Speed Rail Project (HSR), which plans to connect Toronto to Windsor in much shorter travel times.

“I am pleased to announce Mr. Collenette’s appointment as chair of Ontario’s HSR Planning Advisory Board,“ said McGarry. “And I look forward to working with him as we move forward to build Canada’s first High-Speed Rail line.

“This is a landmark project, it has never been done before in Canada, so we wanted to choose somebody that had a lot of experience and background [in the area]. High-Speed Rail has the potential to expand the innovation super corridor within the Toronto to Windsor corridor, allowing businesses to attract the best talent.” 

“This is something that’s really going ahead, I don’t think any other project has gotten to this stage," David Collonette

Collenette was Canada’s Minister of Transportation from 1997 to 2003 and a member of Canada’s Liberal Party from 1974 to 2004 holding several other positions in the House of Commons. He also released a report in 2017 regarding the feasibility of the project and has been an adviser for Ontario since 2015.

McGarry describes Collenette as a “passionate and vocal advocate for the landmark project.”

The High-Speed Rail corridor would potentially make stops in London, Chatham-Kent, Guelph, Pearson Airport and Kitchener. Collenette says the goal is to have the Toronto to London corridor (with a stop in Kitchener) path built by 2025 while the Windsor extension would not be done till 2030 or 2031.

Commuters would get from Kitchener to Union Station in Toronto in 48 minutes and from London to Toronto in 73.

However, there will be an 18-24 month environmental assessment taking place first which allow for different voices to be heard such as Indigenous groups.

“This is something that’s really going ahead, I don’t think any other project has gotten to this stage,"  said Collonette, “You have an environmental assessment, you have officials engaged at MTO, infrastructure Ontario looking at the financing. I’m convinced this is going to be done, and within the time frame.”

The 71-year-old says the volume of population and industry growth is putting demands on the transportation network in the busiest part of Ontario. He added that the benefit to cost ratio makes it a good business proposition as well.

New tracks as well as existing ones would be the path for the trains to travel at up to 250 kilometres per hour.

The announcement, however, did not please Conservative MPP Michael Harris.

Harris, the MPP for Kitchener-Conestoga, says the announcement is “electioneering” engineered by Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals in advance of this summer’s Ontario election.

“This like déjà vu all over again, it’s the second election in a row that the Wynne Liberals have attempted to lure voters with high speed dreams,"  said Harris in a press release.

Former transportation minister to head up advisory board for High-Speed Rail

Goal is to finish portion of the project by 2025

News Feb 13, 2018 by Namish Modi Kitchener Post

Another step has been taken in the construction of a High-Speed Rail corridor between Toronto and Windsor.

On Tuesday, Ontario Minister Transportation Minister Kathryn McGarry along with MPP for Kitchener Centre, Daiene Vernile, announced that David Collenette will head up the advisory board for the High-Speed Rail Project (HSR), which plans to connect Toronto to Windsor in much shorter travel times.

“I am pleased to announce Mr. Collenette’s appointment as chair of Ontario’s HSR Planning Advisory Board,“ said McGarry. “And I look forward to working with him as we move forward to build Canada’s first High-Speed Rail line.

“This is a landmark project, it has never been done before in Canada, so we wanted to choose somebody that had a lot of experience and background [in the area]. High-Speed Rail has the potential to expand the innovation super corridor within the Toronto to Windsor corridor, allowing businesses to attract the best talent.” 

“This is something that’s really going ahead, I don’t think any other project has gotten to this stage," David Collonette

Collenette was Canada’s Minister of Transportation from 1997 to 2003 and a member of Canada’s Liberal Party from 1974 to 2004 holding several other positions in the House of Commons. He also released a report in 2017 regarding the feasibility of the project and has been an adviser for Ontario since 2015.

McGarry describes Collenette as a “passionate and vocal advocate for the landmark project.”

The High-Speed Rail corridor would potentially make stops in London, Chatham-Kent, Guelph, Pearson Airport and Kitchener. Collenette says the goal is to have the Toronto to London corridor (with a stop in Kitchener) path built by 2025 while the Windsor extension would not be done till 2030 or 2031.

Commuters would get from Kitchener to Union Station in Toronto in 48 minutes and from London to Toronto in 73.

However, there will be an 18-24 month environmental assessment taking place first which allow for different voices to be heard such as Indigenous groups.

“This is something that’s really going ahead, I don’t think any other project has gotten to this stage,"  said Collonette, “You have an environmental assessment, you have officials engaged at MTO, infrastructure Ontario looking at the financing. I’m convinced this is going to be done, and within the time frame.”

The 71-year-old says the volume of population and industry growth is putting demands on the transportation network in the busiest part of Ontario. He added that the benefit to cost ratio makes it a good business proposition as well.

New tracks as well as existing ones would be the path for the trains to travel at up to 250 kilometres per hour.

The announcement, however, did not please Conservative MPP Michael Harris.

Harris, the MPP for Kitchener-Conestoga, says the announcement is “electioneering” engineered by Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals in advance of this summer’s Ontario election.

“This like déjà vu all over again, it’s the second election in a row that the Wynne Liberals have attempted to lure voters with high speed dreams,"  said Harris in a press release.